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Saturday, February 24, 2024
Tv Series

Listen to the forgotten flowers 1×05 – The Review: the water lily, or the plea deal

Ascolta i fiori dimenticati 1×05 – La Recensione: la ninfea, o del patteggiamento

I paint the flowers so they won’t die.

There are roads in our lives that we seem to travel despite the numerous signs telling us to immediately reverse direction. We, on the other hand, like moths attracted by the light, continue to be attracted by what or, even worse, who makes us feel bad. Against all common sense and self-love. Why? It’s the age-old question that makes any psychologist greedy. Because feeling those ghostly butterflies in your stomach doesn’t mean you’ve found the right person. From a psychological point of view, “butterflies in the stomach” are a typical mechanism of anxiety disorders, the purpose of which should be to activate in situations of danger or discomfort. Precisely for this reason they often occur in the presence of unknown people or in potentially stressful situations. They are therefore not, as improperly and childishly believed, the sign of having found a soul mate, if anything the exact opposite. Think about it for a second. Did you really prefer to be in the company of a person who constantly keeps you on your toes and with the pit of your stomach rather than with one who transmits tranquility and calmness to you? As we have already said, there are roads that we travel because, sometimes, there is an invisible thread that keeps us anchored to them.

So Alice, although she knows very well what kind of man her father was, does not seem to notice at all what kind of man has approached her. In Agnes Bluff, the girl has decided to start a new life with a job, a house, friends and a new love. But Alice’s longed-for rebirth, determined to rise from her own ashes like a phoenix, doesn’t seem as perfect as it might appear. Back in Thornfield, meanwhile, June finally faces the consequences of secrets kept for too long as we learn more about Candy’s past and Twig is determined to reunite the estranged siblings.

ATTENTION! The following review contains SPOILERS, if you have not yet seen the fifth episode of Listen to the forgotten flowers, we advise you not to continue.

Listen to the forgotten flowers
June Hart (640×360)

The third stage of mourning is the least easy to understand and implement. Pain, anger, and even acceptance are complex but terribly clear passages. Plea bargaining, on the other hand, as a negotiation between two parties means that whoever stays enters into a silent agreement with whoever is no longer there. It’s that moment when, after crying and screaming with sadness and anger, for the first time we really realize the absence of those who said goodbye. An absence still unfillable that we realize with disconcerting amazement. In this episode, the plea deal affects all of the women of Listen to the forgotten flowers. From June dealing with her own demons to Alice grappling with her new life.

June’s world is collapsing. Like a garden that is slowly uprooted of all its beautiful flowers and left to rot. In her unchecked obsession, June has fed her own garden of secrets and shame, hurting as many people as possible. Sigourney Weaver cloaks this character in a curious ambiguity that makes us melt by her gruff affection but also makes us wonder how sincere her apologies are. Charlie, the child left behind, is the real victim of this whole story. Unjustly punished for all the harm the never known parent has caused.

Listen to the forgotten flowers
Candy Blue (640×427)

“You are not a worthy man”.

With these words, the woman addresses her son Clem after discovering him abusing Candy who, at the time, was only 13 years old, too young to fully understand what was happening. But it’s not June’s furious reaction that shocks us, but the steps taken later to get Clem away from Candy. By pushing her teenage and strange son into Agnes’ arms, June is guilty and complicit in the subsequent tragedies. Faced with the heartfelt confession made to Candy in the present, we are unable to get fully involved, partly too horrified by what this confession means. June knew about her son’s urges, she knew about her morbid attentions to women and her inappropriate behavior. Yet he still allowed it to get dangerously close to another innocent flower and destroy it petal by petal.

Silences that tear apart more than physical scars and that conditioned Candy’s life. Unaware of what love and intimacy meant, Candy had a terribly wrong first experience with sex that compromised her relationship with men. Years later, the girl can’t help but think of the sick love she felt for Clem without being able to look at the past objectively.

Listen to the forgotten flowers
Dylan and Alice (640×427)

A fate that also seems to be reserved for Alice, ever closer to living the same tragic story of her mother. Selkie homeless, Alice is far from the sea and unprepared for the predators that prowl the outside world. So here Dylan finally show his true face. We also knew last episode that it was the big bad wolf from Listen to the forgotten flowers but this time we have the confirmation.
After abandoning her at night and in an unknown place, Dylan returns to Alice by leveraging his feelings of guilt and an innocence that only a true predator could smell from miles away. Now almost completely enslaved, Alice confesses his past and what really happened that day many years ago. A silent transfer occurs at this very moment. Dylan assumes the role of father and lover, assumes the role of Clem acquiring boundless power.

Protecting her from the dangers of the world, June never educated Alice or prepared her for evil men and a thousand other dangers. Convinced that she has found a new garden in which to plant roots, the girl is unaware of the thorns that are gripping her more and more. A reflection on toxic love, on the pitfalls of a beautiful face and, as more often than not, we think more about how we imagine love should be rather than the gentle and calm one we already have or could have. TV series are full of love stories like this.

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